Work At Home—Scam, um, Advice

We don’t post all the comments we receive because many of them, the majority in fact, are spam. However, in the interest of education, we thought we’d share this one. It came from Tony, at FatPocket.com, in response to our Work-At-Home & Home Business Scam series:

It’s true that there are many “work from home” scams on internet, but at the same time there are many real legit paying work from home jobs you can do using your computer from the comfort of your home. This website http://www.thefatpocket.com has so much useful information on work from home. I use it on a regular basis. It’s all free and nothing to buy. http://www.thefatpocket.com.” (Tony, FatPocket.com)

Thank you Tony. What a great example of how things aren’t always what they appear to be.

Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing

FatPocket is teeming with work-at-home parasites—exactly the kind we’ve been warning you about. Here are the key tip-offs of the rip-offs:

1) The phrase “legitimate jobs” doesn’t belong on the same page as mystery shopping and online surveys—we’ve found zero evidence that the average person can make a living at either.

2) Ignore that dead giveaway for the moment and click on the “Data Entry Jobs.” What you’ll get is a list of links to other sites.

Click on the first one, Axion Data Services, and you’ll find they specifically say they are not hiring— “DO NOT CALL, DO NOT Send an email.”

The second one, Connect Plus, is a consolidator site that links to other scams including one with this intro: “All the programs we list here have been thoroughly investigated and researched for legitimacy and satisfaction among those actively participating and currently working each program. We have sectioned off our “TOP 10″ Work At Home Opportunities and Careers into two categories for you convenience.”

What a bunch of malarkey. How do these people face themselves in the morning?

Finally, since Tony is actually from FatPocket, saying “I use it (FatPocket) on a regular basis” is a bit like saying “Read my blog. I read it all the time and enjoy it immensely.”

Thanks for helping educate our readers Tony.

UPDATE

Tony replied to our post, and pointed out that we unjustly accused him of malfeasance, and we do apologize. He never claimed you can make a living doing surveys, and he clearly isn’t teaming with parasites as he understood us to say. We said his site was teeming with parasites, and while that seems to be the case, it’s no direct fault of his. The problem Tony’s discovered is that the web is swarming with scum, and he’s smack up against the problem we all have: how to find the needle in the hay stack.

UPDATE 2

We think we probably assessed Tony’s website properly. He hasn’t made the changes he promised, and continues to point unsuspecting visitors to sites that pay him but point the visitor to useless (or worse) sites.

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9 Responses to Work At Home—Scam, um, Advice

  1. Tony says:

    Dear Kate lister:
    I do not understand why you are personally attacking my website by saying my website is teeming up with work-at-home parasites. It’s obvious that you try to thrive by making malicious remarks about my website. If you read terms of use more carefully my website is not in association with any of the websites. I just made my website to help others know which are legit paying work from home jobs. I never made a claim that anybody will make a living doing surveys or this type of jobs. Here YOU are again making a false accusation about my website. If any one of the links to other websites are not what they claim to be (thank you for pointing the Connect-plusdata out to me) then I’ll be more than happy to get that link off. And as you already know after checking out my website most of them are legit real websites that are what they claim to be. You don’t need to be and act like a spiteful person making wrongful malicious defamatory remarks about my website in order to succeed and attract readers. If you are unhappy about my reply and posting my website link in your blog, you could have simply rejected my posting instead of making a false accusation and blowing a small glitch out of proportion and attack my website maliciously and viciously.

  2. Tony says:

    Dear Kate lister:
    This is my second writing to ask you to take off this page on which you make defamatory remarks and write wrong things about my website. As I mentioned in my first post yesterday (in case you deleted it without even reading it), I do not understand why you are personally attacking my website by saying my website is teeming up with work-at-home parasites. It’s clear that you do not understand the concept behind my website or other similar ones. I simply narrowed down the list of thousands of work-from-home jobs that are found on Yahoo and Google and posted the links to the ones that I thought were better than others on my website so that people don’t have waste their time by looking through thousands of them. If my website is a scam as you made an accusation in your post just because I posted links on my website then you also need to tell the world that Yahoo and Google and all other search engines are teeming up with work-from-home parasites because they too have links to even worst and real work-from-home scam websites. It’s obvious that you try to thrive by making malicious remarks and wrongful accusations about my website. If you read terms of use more carefully my website is not in association with any of the websites. I just made my website to help others make easier and better choices if they are looking for work from home type of jobs. I never made a claim that any one will make a living doing surveys or this type of work, but here YOU made a wrong accusation about my website that I did. If any one of the links to other websites are not what they claim to be then I’ll be more than happy to get that link off. And as you already know after checking out my website most of them are legit real websites with many satisfied customers that are what they claim to be. You don’t need to be and act like a spiteful person making wrongful malicious defamatory remarks about my website in order to succeed and attract readers. If you are unhappy about my initial posting in your blog you could have simply rejected my posting instead of making a wrongful accusation and blowing a small glitch out of proportion and attack my website maliciously and viciously. If you do not correct your post or take it down I’ll make a formal complaint against your website and you for wrongful accusation and defamatory remarks regarding my website to the FCC. Thank you.

  3. Tom says:

    Just discovered your comments, Tony. Sorry for the lack of response. Ironically, they were both marked as spam by the WordPress plug-in Akismet.

    We’ll revisit your site, our observations, and your comments and respond here as soon as we can.

  4. Tom says:

    Did some more research, re-read our post and your comments as promised.

    We’ll accept your claim that you aren’t intentionally trying to scam anyone, Tony. And you’re right, you don’t claim anyone can make a living doing surveys. Indeed, you make it clear that it you do it just for fun to make a little pocket money. So we owe you an apology for indicating otherwise. We’ll add an update to the post itself saying as much.

    That said, we still feel that many, if not most, of the sites you recommend are not legitimate money-making opportunities, and many really are scams. That’s not a surprise unless you’re very, very careful selecting them. Our own and other studies have shown that 97% of the work-at-home listings on the web are rip-offs.

    Looking at just the first few of your listings under Data Entry, we find Axion, but (as we said in the original post) they don’t hire people through web ads. So that’s not a scam, per se; but it certainly isn’t a job opportunity.

    You agreed with us that Connect-plus is not legitimate. As of this writing you haven’t removed them although you said you would, but we’ll just assume that’s an oversight and you’ll correct it.

    Then there’s Cyber Services, Inc . . . but that link doesn’t go anywhere. Maybe the site is just off the air? Anyway, no jobs there.

    Next you list eCallogy, but if you go to their site you’ll find you have to pay $20 an hour for product training, and they offer no call center or operator training. All the good call-service companies we know–and we’ve interviewed honchos at several for our forthcoming book–all pay you for product training.

    So, while we applaud your effort to make finding work home from jobs easier to find, it looks to us like you have some work to do! If there’s any way we can help, let us know.

  5. Tom says:

    Well, ten days have gone by and Tony still hasn’t removed the Connect-Plus link, which he said he would do. Makes us suspicious, as we said before, that things aren’t always what they appear to be.

  6. Tom says:

    Just as we suspected. It’s eight MONTHS later and nothing has changed. The site’s a scam.

  7. sinema says:

    so helpful this article. thanks mate.

  8. Jon says:

    Tony, suck it up and stop acting like a baby lol.

  9. Margaret says:

    Hilarious! “Axion Data Services” sent me a job offer this afternoon via email. The email (which strangely came from a Road Runner cable modem IP) said a requirement to accept the job offer was to go to “Axion-Data-ServicesDOTcom” (after replacing the “DOT” with a “.”). It’s funny that the domain was just created a few days ago. The website at that domain meta-refreshes to “pinnaclecreditscore.com” which has only one link on it that redirects to “creditreport.com”. That must be their scam, they’ve got an affiliate ID at creditreport.com so they may be getting a little bit of cash from any desperate person who is thrilled by a job offer. I’m sending the admins at axiondata.com a copy of the email and its headers in case they need it as evidence.

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